Welcome to the Mount Sinai Emergency Medicine Residency Website.

Here you will find information regarding rotation schedules, academic resources, wellness and facts about our program and residents. Check out our bios and photos. Please also visit the Emergency Department's official residency website. This site is intended for Mount Sinai EM residency purposes only, and no information on these pages is intended or should be construed as medical advice. Read more.

Humeral Head, Where You At?

Which type of shoulder dislocation is most common- posterior, inferior, anterior? Which x-ray views can you obtain to help you differentiate among these types?

Continue reading “Humeral Head, Where You At?” »

Panic Button!

You are asked by the triage nurse to evaluate a pregnant patient whose water broke and is experiencing contractions. Over the course of the next 45 seconds, you find yourself holding a newborn boy. He’s limp, apneic and not making a sound. Besides reaching for the panic button, what else can you do?

Continue reading “Panic Button!” »

A Bucket O’ Blood

You are taking a water break during your resus shift when you hear “clinical upgrade, acute zone 1”.

You rush back to see a 60-year-old patient holding a bucket of bright red blood and you find out that he has an extensive PMH including HepC cirrhosis.

After handling the initial resuscitation, you consider which additional tests and meds to order when your colleague reminds you to also give ceftriaxone. Why would this help?

Continue reading “A Bucket O’ Blood” »

Status Epilepticus

Your patient arrives by ambulance having a seizure.  EMS administered ativan 10 minutes ago.  You give a second dose but the seizure continues.  What should you do?

Continue reading “Status Epilepticus” »

Interscalene Plexus Block

Your patient is a 25 year old male with a shoulder dislocation.  He needs analgesia, but has a date later and does not want to risk dimming his considerable mental acuity with systemic medications.  What to do?

Continue reading “Interscalene Plexus Block” »

Greg Fernandez, MD


Archives

Categories