Welcome to the Mount Sinai Emergency Medicine Residency Website.

Here you will find information regarding rotation schedules, academic resources, wellness and facts about our program and residents. Check out our bios and photos. Please also visit the Emergency Department's official residency website. This site is intended for Mount Sinai EM residency purposes only, and no information on these pages is intended or should be construed as medical advice. Read more.

More Power

59 y/o M presents to the cardiac room after cardiac arrest. EMS reports a downtime of 5 minutes with immediate bystander CPR. The initial rhythm was vifb that responded to two EMS shocks and CPR. The patient arrived with ROSC. Soon after the patient goes back into VF. You try everything in the books-continuous compressions, repeated shocks at 360J, all the drugs, but nothing breaks it. Twenty minutes have passed. Is there anything that can be tried or should you call it?

 

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Pregnancy Pain

A 29 y/o F 20 weeks pregnant presents with fever, dysuria, and left flank pain. She has some CVA tenderness on the right. WBC is elevated to 15. UA shows both blood and leukocytes in the urine. You are concerned about pyelonephritis vs. and infected stone. What are the risks of imaging this patient?

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The Trouble with Wheezing

4 month-old M PMH low birth weight presents with a 3 day history cough and runny nose.  Today his mother reports a low grade fever.  His immunizations are up to date. He has no known sick contacts, but he attends day care. His respiratory rate is 39 and is coughing frequently. On lung exam he has mild wheezes, but sp O2 is 96% on room air. The remainder of his physical exam is normal. His nasal swab is positive for RSV and you make the diagnosis of bronchiolitis. What factors may cause you to admit the child for apnea observation?

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Kidney Pains

53 y/o M PMD ESRD on dialysis presents with mild chest pain, now resolved. His EKG is unremarkable and trop is mildly elevated. There are no signs of overt heart failure. You call his cardiologist who tells you he has a “chronic troponin leak.” Should you be concerned to send this patient home?

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Get That Line

Vascular access in ill neonates who present to the ED can be challenging. Umbilical vein catheterization can be a life-saving option. The umbilical vein remains patent and viable for cannulation until approximately 1 week after birth.

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